City of Lincoln and Lancaster County Coronavirus (COVID-19) Mitigation and Response

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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Mitigation and Response

Latest Statistics

What's Happening Now
graphic of vaccine

Get vaccinated or booster doses now.

COVID-19 vaccine is approved for everyone age 6 months and older. First booster doses are approved for everyone age 5 and older. Second booster doses are approved for people age 50 and above and those 12 and older with weakened immune systems.

COVID-19 Vaccine Registration and Scheduling

Sign up and schedule your appointment

Regístrese y programe su cita

سجل وجدولة موعدك

Đăng ký và lên lịch cuộc hẹn của bạn

Upcoming Vaccine Clinics

For children under 5 (appointments are encouraged, walk-ins also welcome at all locations)

  • Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., LLCHD, 3131 “O” St.
  • Wednesdays: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., LLCHD

For everyone age 5 and older (appointments are encouraged, walk-ins also welcome at all locations)

  • Friday, August 12, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., LLCHD, 3131 “O” St.
  • Monday, August 15, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., LLCHD
  • Friday, August 19, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., LLCHD

These clinics will offer first and second doses for age 5 and older, first booster doses for age 5 and older, and second booster doses for those age 50 and older and those age 12 and older with weakened immune systems.

Check availability and schedule your appointment.

High Risk of COVID-19 Spread

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The dial's current week pointer is at low orange, or 5 on a scale of 1-8 (1 is low risk; 8 is severe risk). The dial's previous week pointer is also at 5.
Severe High Moderate Low

This COVID-19 Risk Dial provides a summary of current conditions in the Lincoln-Lancaster County community. Each color incorporates federal and national guidance published by public health experts and is coupled with specific guidance.

The Risk Dial was developed to help communicate the risk of spread and impact of COVID-19 in the community. Since its inception in May 2020, five primary metrics were used based on local data: Positivity Rate, Cases, Testing, Contact Tracing, and Health Care System Capacity. Two additional metrics were recently added - Vaccination Rate and Death Rate. Data on these two metrics were not available during development of the risk dial, but now we better understand local risk for COVID deaths and can track the progress of vaccinations.

This is only guidance and does not replace federal, state, or local directed health measures. At-risk and vulnerable populations should take stringent precautions.

Community Guidance and Recommendations
Outside the Home
Vaccination

Stay up to date:   Vaccine Information

Physical Distancing Outside the Home
  • Distance at least 6 feet from anyone outside the home
  • Avoid close interactions with symptomatic people
  • Follow CDC Travel Guidelines
Face Masks Outside the Home
  • Wear a face mask in indoor settings when unable to distance
  • Wear a face mask in crowded outdoor settings when unable to distance
  • Wear a face mask if you have allergy, cold or COVID-like symptoms
Hand Washing Outside the Home
  • Frequently wash hands for at least 20 seconds, especially after touching high contact surfaces, sneezing/coughing/touching face, or before eating
  • Use hand sanitizer when handwashing is inaccessible
Illness Monitoring Outside the Home
  • If ill with allergy, cold or COVID-like symptoms, wear a mask, get tested or use home test, stay at home, and contact your health care provider for information and available treatments if you test positive
  • Minimize contact with symptomatic people
At Home
Vaccination

Stay up to date:   Vaccine Information

Physical Distancing at Home
  • No distancing for people without symptoms, unless they are under quarantine
Face Masks at Home
  • If you or someone in your home are at high risk for severe illness, wear a mask around others
  • If you or someone in your home has tested positive for COVID-19 and you are unable to fully isolate, wear a face mask
  • Wear a face mask if you have allergy, cold or COVID-like symptoms
Hand Washing at Home
  • Frequently wash hands for at least 20 seconds, especially after touching high contact surfaces, sneezing/coughing/touching face, or before eating
Illness Monitoring at Home
  • If ill with allergy, cold or COVID-like symptoms, wear a mask, get tested or use home test, stay at home, and contact your health care provider for information and available treatments if you test positive
  • Minimize contact with symptomatic people
At-Risk and
Vulnerable Populations

For those over age 65, people with underlying health conditions, and other populations at heightened risk from COVID-19:

  • Wear a mask whenever in indoor settings and crowded outdoor setting to increase your level of protection
  • Consult with your health care provider about additional protective actions you should take
COVID-19 Testing

The CDC has expanded the list of symptoms for COVID-19 to include these:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Repeated muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Residents begin the testing process with a free online risk assessment available at BryanHealth.com and CHIHealth.com.


Bryan Health: All rapid COVID-19 testing will be done at Bryan’s NorthPointe Urgent Care location at 5901 N. 27th St. Appointments are required and can be scheduled by visiting bryanhealth.org/covid-testing.

PCR testing continues to be available at Bryan’s two other urgent care locations – Lifepointe, 7501 S. 27th St. and Southeast, 4333 S. 86th St. Appointments are required and can be scheduled by visiting bryanurgentcare.org.


CHI Health: Walk-in testing is available at three priority care locations: Antelope Creek, 2510 S. 40th St., Suite 100; Southwest, 1240 Aries Drive; and Stevens Creek, 1601 N. 86th St.

For drive up testing, virtual quick care is available 24/7 at CHIHealth.com to chat with a provider and schedule a testing appointment.


Nomi Health: COVID-19 testing is available at Gateway Square, 6450 O St. Pre-register at testing.nomihealth.com/signup/ne.


Local pharmacies including CVS, HyVee and Walgreens, health care provider offices and urgent care clinics also offer testing. Those uninsured or underinsured can call the LLCHD COVID-19 hotline at 402-441-8006 to be connected to testing resources.


At-home tests: Every household in the U.S. is now eligible to receive a third round of free, at-home COVID-19 tests from the federal government. Visit covidtests.gov to place an order.

At-home test reporting: Lancaster County residents who take at-home tests may send the results to the Lincoln-Lancaster County Health Department. All information is confidential and protected by Nebraska State Law. Visit lincoln.ne.gov/covid19reportresults to submit results.

Submit your home test results
Isolation and Quarantine Guidance

If you’ve tested positive or have symptoms of COVID-19, stay home and isolate.

If you have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19, you may need to quarantine.

COVID-19 Quarantine and Isolation Calculator

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s quarantine and isolation calculator helps determine when and for how long people with COVID-19 and close contacts need to stay home, get tested and mask up.

Please note: This tool isn’t for people with COVID-19 who are moderately or severely ill or those who have weakened immune systems - talk to your health care provider about when to end isolation. This tool also doesn’t apply to cases and close contacts identified in certain settings. For information about isolation and quarantine in high-risk congregate settings and healthcare settings, refer to COVID-19 Quarantine and Isolation. Parents with children in K-12 schools or early care and education programs should consult the program administrator for specific isolation and quarantine guidance in their school or program setting.

What you need to know about Ivermectin
  • The Food and Drug Administration has not authorized or approved ivermectin for use in preventing or treating COVID-19 in humans or animals. Ivermectin is approved for human use to treat infections caused by some parasitic worms and head lice and skin conditions like rosacea.
  • Ivermectin has not been proven as a way to prevent or treat COVID-19.
  • Taking large doses of ivermectin is dangerous.
  • Seek immediate medical attention or call the poison control center hotline (1-800-222-1222) for advice if you have taken ivermectin or a product that contains ivermectin and are having symptoms. Signs and symptoms include: gastrointestinal effects (nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea), headache, blurred vision, dizziness, fast heart rate, and low blood pressure. Other severe nervous system effects have been reported, including tremors, seizures, hallucinations, confusion, loss of coordination and balance, decreased alertness, and coma.
  • Never use medications intended for animals on yourself or other people. Animal ivermectin products are very different from those approved for humans. Use of animal ivermectin for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19 in humans is dangerous.

Additional resources: